Author Topic: PERFECTLY ORGANISED TABLE  (Read 25611 times)

pascal

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PERFECTLY ORGANISED TABLE
« on: June 24, 2011, 12:13:29 PM »
When I first became interested in roulette all I knew was "the payouts" and the 35/1 for a single number looked very good to me. The first time I heard the words "house edge" I asked, what is the house edge? And was told that zero was the house edge. After giving it some thought I reasoned that if I betted zero then I was taking the house edge away from the casino.

Alright, alright, so I was stupid yeah. My diminishing bankroll told me that.!

I started asking myself questions. I wanted to understand. Everything I read told me that the numbers were randomly distributed around the wheel so I had a look at the wheel and decided that number distribution was not TOTALLY random.

I then asked myself why the numbers on the layout read 1 2 3 verticaly as opposed to 1 2 3 horizontaly. I answered the question to my own satisfaction.

Reading through the posts on this forum I read that "The table is a scattered representation of the wheel, and it is scattered and "randomised" for good reason." In the post HOW YOU CAN AND CAN'T BEAT ROULETTE.

I've only been a member of this forum for a few days and the one thing I know to be true is that Steve knows what he is talking about. He makes sense.

However, I think the table is NOT a scattered representation of the wheel and that the wheel IS a scattered represenation of the table. I hasten to add that I feel like an audatious schoolboy who has just questioned something that teacher said.

To me the table is perfectly organised and the wheel is a scattered representation of the table. If I am prooved to be wrong, so be it. I will accept that. However, please don't ask me to say  why I believe what I have written as I will not answer that question on an open forum.

pascal.

 


Steve

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Re: PERFECTLY ORGANISED TABLE
« Reply #1 on: June 24, 2011, 12:49:28 PM »
Quote
I think the table is NOT a scattered representation of the wheel and that the wheel IS a scattered represenation of the table

Why do you think there is a difference?

Also if we didnt question teachers, then inaccurate teachings would never change.

pascal

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Re: PERFECTLY ORGANISED TABLE
« Reply #2 on: June 24, 2011, 01:16:51 PM »
My perception of both wheel and table.

Or are you saying that there is no difference between the two statements?

pascal

Steve

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Re: PERFECTLY ORGANISED TABLE
« Reply #3 on: June 24, 2011, 02:37:35 PM »
Saying one is a scattered representation of the other is much the same thing.

hamishmac

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Re: PERFECTLY ORGANISED TABLE
« Reply #4 on: June 24, 2011, 06:00:50 PM »
I agree with Steve. It is saying the same thing, just your personal perception/belief. Like t"he glass is half full, or half empty"

pascal

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Re: PERFECTLY ORGANISED TABLE
« Reply #5 on: June 24, 2011, 10:31:03 PM »
Thank you for your replies. My perception of both wheel and table plays a large part in my aproach to how and where I place my money. And my cup runneth over. :)  ;)





Steve

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Re: PERFECTLY ORGANISED TABLE
« Reply #6 on: June 24, 2011, 11:38:36 PM »
I prefer "the glass it st 50% capacity"

Pascal, how do you currently play roulette?

pascal

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Re: PERFECTLY ORGANISED TABLE
« Reply #7 on: June 25, 2011, 01:21:00 AM »
I always play real live wheel.
"How do I play?"  My method of play is maths based. My perception of both wheel and table is also maths based. The maths I use are based on the teachings of Blaire Pascal.

What I know about computers could be written on the back of a postage stamp.
Having said that, VB is also an integral part of the way I play.


pascal

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Re: PERFECTLY ORGANISED TABLE
« Reply #8 on: June 26, 2011, 05:13:14 AM »
My perception of the table is as follows:-

There are four sets of nine numbers per set.

The first nine (lowest) numbers are 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9. (set one)
numbers 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18. (set two)
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27. (set three)
28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36. (set four)

I then use the following maths to make each set 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9.

10 (1+0)=1. 11 (1+1)=2. 12 (1+2)=3. and so on through to 36.

numbers 28 29 are reduced to one and two respectively. 28 (2+8)=10 (1+0)=1. 29 (2+9)=11 (1+1)=2.

I now have four identical sets of nine identical numbers.   A perfectly ordered table.

It will be noted that all numbers in all sets are exactly the same distance apart on the table.

My perception of the wheel is as follows :-

My perfect sets of numbers  are scattered around the wheel.




Steve

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Re: PERFECTLY ORGANISED TABLE
« Reply #9 on: June 27, 2011, 10:36:05 AM »
When I look at the roulette wheel, I dont see numbers - just pockets with markings.

pascal

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Re: PERFECTLY ORGANISED TABLE
« Reply #10 on: June 27, 2011, 12:39:31 PM »
Lol. You shouldn't be looking at the wheel Steve, you should be looking at the computor!  ;)

pascal

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Re: PERFECTLY ORGANISED TABLE
« Reply #11 on: June 27, 2011, 01:09:06 PM »
Just realised that my last post could be misconstrued.

I meant looking at the computer screen.

Meanwhile, I'll go and learn how to spell. !!

Steve

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Re: PERFECTLY ORGANISED TABLE
« Reply #12 on: June 27, 2011, 02:38:06 PM »
From 9-5, I am almost always looking at a screen.

weebly

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Re: PERFECTLY ORGANISED TABLE
« Reply #13 on: June 27, 2011, 04:52:57 PM »
I am always looking at touch screens  ::)

Steve

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Re: PERFECTLY ORGANISED TABLE
« Reply #14 on: June 28, 2011, 01:28:30 PM »
.. and that is about the limit you should say in a public area.