Ladbrokes Never Invented the Wheel – Poaching Customers Was Their Line

Article by: S. Bhara

It is believed that roulette was invented by a scientist trying to develop a perpetual motion machine. But we may never know for sure who first discovered the wheel, be it the one on your car, or the one with little red, black and green segments on it which fascinates us. What we do know is online gambling sites, such as Ladbrokes online Casino, thrive from roulette. Yet its very different from Ladbrokes’ starting point, which was bookmaking on horse racing back in 1886.

It was not until the late 1960’s the British betting company bought into the ownership and operation of casinos.  It was a relatively short affair too. And like many others, it ended in scandal and a bitter divorce. Remarkable profitability was not the reason for Ladbrokes pulling out of the casino business in the late 1970’s. Ironically, it was greed.  The same greed which saw Ladbrokes senior casino management in London, where they operated four casinos, and hatch a cunning plan to record the registration plates of cars parked outside of the Playboy Casino on Park Lane.

Car registration details at hand and a few corrupt policemen on the payroll (who accessed the Police National Computer) saw a database of Playboy customers forged, one which Ladbrokes wasted no time in using in order to coax away clients from its chief competitor in an unethical manner.

But this was not the primary crime which concerned the British Gaming Board. Sending high-class women into the Playboy Club (with handsome rewards) to lure high rollers (primarily Iranians and Arabs at the time) into the Ladbrokes clubs was their chief demurral.

With both Police and Playboy subsequently objecting to Ladbrokes’ casino licences, the famous bookmaker was down to just one London gaming hall in 1979 and by 1980 they operated no casinos anywhere in the UK.

The following year Playboy’s flagship London casino was officially declared to be the most profitable casino in the world and made the corporation $32 million.  As for Ladbrokes, they were out the casino business for almost 15 years. They resurfaced with some high-profile purchases buying four London clubs between 1994 and 1996 and setting up a new venue at Paddington’s famous train station in 2006 which proved a loss maker.  Once again, they are out of the land-based casino business.

So when we say Ladbrokes love Roulette, let’s be very clear it is not the game of chance which can be very profitable but also be manipulated by tuned-in players that they like.  In this modern era it is the fabled  What they love most are the Random Number Generators that can represent spins of a roulette wheel.

Roulette is a primary game of choice for Ladbrokes online casino customers. It’s also the game of choice for customers who play their Fixed Odds Betting Terminals (FOBT’s) within their 2,153 retail shops in Britain.

At a last count, Ladbrokes had just shy of 9,000 FOBT’s which made an average weekly profit of £913 ($1,335).  Why wouldn’t they love it? And why would you bother with the staffing costs, potential cheats and old-style espionage involved with a traditional land-based casino business if you were Ladbrokes?

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